10 Modern Motor Lodges Worth a Stay

10 Modern Motor Lodges Worth a Stay

Forget the penthouse suite—these retro pads are the epitome of style

Stephanie Granada

#lazy-image-115661 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115661 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115661.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Thomas J. Story

Best. Site. Ever.

1 of 16

Thomas J. Story

Best. Site. Ever.

My favorite campsite isn’t easy to get to, and it’s even harder to book. Each year, only around 3,000 in-season permits to the Enchantments are released, guaranteeing lottery winners nearly solitary access to a massive and glorious swath of glaciated rock and forest. The rugged range, 115 miles east of Seattle, is strewn with alpine lakes and defended by curious mountain goats. “We got here first,” they seem to say. And they’re right.

For years, access to this alpine Valhalla had evaded me. But one day my buddy Ryan texted, offering salvation: “My friend’s got extra spots on his permit. Let’s do this.” Weeks later, there we were, blasting past the Bavarian throwback town of Leavenworth, packs pregnant with gear, frothing to reach the trailhead.

The hike into our first camp was anything but easy. For me, anyway: My lanky friend Wes marches like he’s trying to prove something, and Martin, an elite trail runner, once completed the three-day route we had planned in a day. As we reached elevation, the teeth of the Cascades revealed themselves, serrated crags attacking the sky.

We pressed on: Up a scree of rubble and over the cusp to an otherworldly cerulean lake surrounded by hardened snowpack. Here, we spread out, aware of the encroaching goats. “They drink your pee,” someone pointed out. “They like the salt.” I eyed them warily. Weird goats aside, this was a lifetime site, a world so different and raw that it reminded us of our small place in the big picture. Martin and Ryan stripped to their shorts and slid like kids down a sheet of ice into one of the lakes. Wes actually relaxed. I forgot about the Internet. We were in thrall to the world around us—not chained to a desk, and definitely not confined to an astroturfed “campsite” with a 68-footer belching diesel fumes into our airspace.

This is why I camp. That release, that reminder. And I know I’m not alone. We asked influencers and athletes in the outdoor industry for their own special places, which we’ve included here. Enjoy—and get camping! — Matt Bean, Sunset editor-in-chief

#lazy-image-115665 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.79977502812;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115665 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115665.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Scott Dickerson

Kachemak Bay State Park, AK

2 of 16

Scott Dickerson

Kachemak Bay State Park, AK

We love taking a boat or water taxi from Homer 20 minutes to Tutka Bay, at the western end of the Kachemak Bay State Park to camp at the Sea Star Cove cabin. The cabin is nestled on the hill above the beach in mossy trees, with a fire ring and covered porch overlooking Cook Inlet and the rest of Tutka Bay. Gather your own firewood, grill a fresh salmon on the beach, take your morning coffee outside to watch whales, puffins, eagles, sea otters, and salmon jumping straight from the sea.” —Emma Teal Laukitis and Claire Neaton, founders of theSalmon Sisters, Homer, Alaska

#lazy-image-115664 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.79943767573;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115664 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115664.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Jeremy Koreski

Great Bear Rainforest, B.C.

3 of 16

Jeremy Koreski

Great Bear Rainforest, B.C.

One of the best things about camping while on a fly fishing drift trip is that you just pull over when you find a spot that looks right and you are ready to call it a day. The temps might be below zero and you wake up to frozen waders and loud noises crashing in the bush nearby (moose? Grizzly?) but for me that’s what camping is about…getting out of my comfort zone. —Jeremy Koreski, photographer, Vancouver Island

#lazy-image-115663 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115663 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115663.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Courtesy of Doe Bay

Doe Bay, Orcas Island, WA

4 of 16

Courtesy of Doe Bay

Doe Bay, Orcas Island, WA

I love this hippy dippy commune resort in the San Juan Islands, which has cabins, a sauna, and a seed-to-table restaurant. If you want more rusticity, book one of their primitive campsites perched atop a cliff overlooking the Pacific. —Graham Hiemstra, Founder, Field Mag

#lazy-image-115673 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.80072028812;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115673 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115673.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Courtesy of Hipcamp

The Landing, Index, WA

5 of 16

Courtesy of Hipcamp

The Landing, Index, WA

Not only can you set up camp on your own pet-friendly, private beach along the Skykomish River in the Cascade Mountains, but you’re also surrounded by the most pristine, temperate rainforest you can find. —Alyssa Ravasio, Founder + CEO of Hipcamp

#lazy-image-115675 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.79951980792;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115675 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115675.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Craig Okraska

Wind River Mountain Range, WY

6 of 16

Craig Okraska

Wind River Mountain Range, WY

Of all of the dramatic solid granite peaks and cliffs, Dogtooth Cirque, near the North-Fork of the Popo Agie River by Papoose Lake, is my favorite. After five years of visiting, my partners and I put in a new free climb here, up the Monolith, a 1,200-foot cliff of sheer granite rock. —Mike Lilygren, co-founder of Maven Outdoor Equipment Company, Lander, WY

#lazy-image-115671 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.80006620324;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115671 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115671.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

James Dustin Parsons / Getty Images

Pacific Crest Trail, OR

7 of 16

James Dustin Parsons / Getty Images

Pacific Crest Trail, OR

Three-quarters of the way through a northward hike on the Pacific Crest Trail from Pamelia Lake through Jefferson Park in Oregon there is an exposed ridge at the apex of the trail where Mt. Jefferson is at your back, Jefferson Park expands below you, and Mt. Hood looms off in the distance, beckoning. —Aaron Morris, co-founder Wild Root Spirits, Portland

#lazy-image-115674 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115674 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115674.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

M.M. Sweet / Getty Images

Wainapanapa State Park, Maui, HI

8 of 16

M.M. Sweet / Getty Images

Wainapanapa State Park, Maui, HI

You can’t visit Maui without experiencing the road to Hana’s windy roads, steep cliffs, and roadside waterfalls. The journey long so I split it up camping at Wainapanapa State Park. It’s a destination in itself, with a beautiful black sand beach, swimming caves, seaside trails, and breathtaking views.” —Luke Walsh, Founder Paia Bowls, Maui

#lazy-image-115666 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115666 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115666.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Brad Mitchell / Getty Images

MacKerricher State Park, Fort Bragg, CA

9 of 16

Brad Mitchell / Getty Images

MacKerricher State Park, Fort Bragg, CA

There’s a beautiful beach bluff here with the all-time best sunset view, plus tide pools and whale watching in the winter and spring. The tent sites are all spacious, and there’s also some great hike-in sites that are cozy and more private. The site itself is close to Fort Bragg for any last-minute supplies you might have forgotten. —Chef Melissa Perello, Frances and Octavia restaurants, San Francisco

#lazy-image-115662 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.800332088;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115662 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115662.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Samantha T. Photography / Getty Images

Big Sur, CA

10 of 16

Samantha T. Photography / Getty Images

Big Sur, CA

To cap off my first year in the Golden State, I joined friends in their annual surf pilgrimage to Big Sur. The thunderous winter surf pounded massive rock pinnacles, creating an anxious undertone to the safety of our campsite. Looking back at the cliffs as I bobbed amidst the kelp heads in the surf, this was the moment that I realized we are part of a bigger story. —Chris Sears, Attendee Relations Managers Outdoor Retailer

#lazy-image-115667 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.79992841804;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115667 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115667.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Ron Thomas / Getty Images

Montaña de Oro State Park, Los Osos, CA

11 of 16

Ron Thomas / Getty Images

Montaña de Oro State Park, Los Osos, CA

As someone who had a series of unfortunate camping trips as a kid, I can confirm that Islay Creek Campground [located at this state park] changes dubious minds. The beach, just a short walk from the campground, is full of tidepools and small caves for exploring. A trail leads to a bluff where you can watch the waves crash as the sun sets. As if the natures of wonder aren’t enough, there are also easily accessible, clean bathrooms. —Michelle Race, co-founder Black Girls Trekkin’, LA

#lazy-image-115660 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115660 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115660.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Courtesy of Benton Hot Springs

Benton Hot Springs, CA

12 of 16

Courtesy of Benton Hot Springs

Benton Hot Springs, CA

This isolated campground in the eastern Sierra Nevada, about 45 minutes outside the town of Mammoth Lakes, comes with desert and mountain views, plenty of privacy, and a short hiking trail from the site. But the reason you’ll come to Benton Hot Springs is that each campsite comes with its own private hot springs-fed tub. — Dan Abrams, co-founder of Flylow Gear

#lazy-image-115670 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115670 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115670.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Trevor Cleveland / Unsplash

Moab, UT

13 of 16

Trevor Cleveland / Unsplash

Moab, UT

Off Highway 191, dirt and slickrock roads wind through the desert in a network of dispersed sites comprising the Northern Moab Free Campground. The further you drive, the fewer people you find.  High clearance four-wheel drive is a must and there are no amenities, just how we like it. —Chris Clearman, Founder of Matador adventure gear, Boulder, Co.

#lazy-image-115672 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115672 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115672.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Gibson Pictures / Getty Images

Sand Flats, UT

14 of 16

Gibson Pictures / Getty Images

Sand Flats, UT

This edgy shelf of desert adjacent to the Slickrock bike trail in Moab is close enough to town to grab milkshakes and fries at Milts, but far enough away that things still seemed wild. It feels like the crest of the world, the LaSal mountains to the east, the sprawl of Canyonlands in the other direction, the edge of adventures unfolding. —Heather Hansman, Author

#lazy-image-115659 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.80011968881;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115659 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115659.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Snikeltrut / Getty Images

Amphitheater Campground, San Juan Mountains, CO

15 of 16

Snikeltrut / Getty Images

Amphitheater Campground, San Juan Mountains, CO

While not the most off-the-map camping spot in the world Amphitheater has an amazing location, just outside Ouray, Colorado and it is one of our favorite stopping spots on the way to Telluride. The views from the campsite are incredible, the campground itself is immaculately maintained and Ouray is such a fun town to spend a day with great restaurants, bars and best of all hot springs. —Jedd Rose, Co-Founder Topo Designs, Fort Collins, Colorado

#lazy-image-115668 {
–aspect-ratio: 1.8;
–display-width: calc(100vw – var(–gutter-width, 15px));
–display-height: calc( var(–display-width) / var(–aspect-ratio) );
height: var(–display-height);
min-height: var(–display-height);
}
@media(min-width: 900px) {
#lazy-image-115668 {
–display-width: 750px;
}
}
#lazy-image-115668.loaded {
–display-height: auto;
}

Chiranjib Ghorai / Getty Images

Mount Elbert, CO

16 of 16

Chiranjib Ghorai / Getty Images

Mount Elbert, CO

I was looking for campgrounds with my dog when I stumbled upon a secret, free, dispersed camping area just past the Mount Elbert-Mount Massive trailheads, along the 4×4 road. It’s amazingly quiet and there’s a great stream for water. I now camp there every year with my two sons. —Bryan Dayton, founder of Half Eaten Cookie Hospitality, Denver

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific


Best Clickbank Products